sexta-feira, 30 de outubro de 2009

Gov. silvério Marques visita o Liceu em 1961 - Parte I


video
Excerto de um filme/documentário de Augusto Cabrita (1923-1993) intitulado "Macau".. uma curta metragem filmada em 16 mm.

quinta-feira, 29 de outubro de 2009

Gov. Silvério Marques de visita ao Liceu Nacional Infante D. Henrique em 1961 - Parte 2

video

Série de Postais Antigos - editados pelo ICM em 1985











The Land of the Boxers: 1903

Macau na viragem do século 19 para o século 20. Eis um retrato de Macau feito pelo capitão Gordon Casserly do exército indiano. O capítulo X foi dedicado a Macau.
Bairro S. Lázaro
In the portuguese colony of Macao - pages 231-255
Forty miles from Hong Kong, hidden away among the countless islands that fringe the entrance to the estuary of the Chukiang or Pearl River, lies the Portuguese settlement of Macao. Once flourishing and prosperous, the centre of European trade with Southern China, it is now decaying and almost unknown — killed by the com- petition of its young and successful rival. Long before Elizabeth ascended the throne of England the venturesome Portuguese sailors and merchants had reached the Far East. There they carried their country's flag over seas where now it never flies. An occasional gunboat represents in Chinese waters their once powerful and far-roaming navy. In the island of Lampacao, off the south-eastern coast, their traders were settled, pushing their com- merce with the mainland. In 1557 the neigh- bouring peninsula of Macao was ceded to them in token of the Chinese Emperor's gratitude for their aid in destroying the power of a pirate chief who had long held sway in the seas around. The Dutch, the envious rivals of the Portuguese in the East, turned covetous eyes on the little colony which speedily began to flourish. In 1622 the troops in Macao were despatched to assist the Chinese against the Tartars. Taking advantage of their absence, the Governor of the Dutch East Indies fitted out a fleet to capture their city. In the June of that year the hostile ships appeared off Macao and landed a force to storm the fort The valiant citizens fell upon and defeated the invaders ; and the Dutch sailed away baffled. Until the early part of the nineteenth century the Portuguese paid an annual tribute of five hundred taels to the Chinese Government in acknowledgment of their nominal suzerainty. In 1848, the then Governor, Ferreira Amaral, refused to continue this payment and expelled the Chinese officials from the colony. In 1887, the independence of Macao was formally admitted by the Emperor in a treaty to that effect. But the palmy days of its commerce died with the birth of Hong Kong. The importance of the Portuguese settlement has dwindled away. Macao is but a relic of the past. Its harbour is empty. The sea around has silted up with the detritus from the Pearl River until now no large vessels can approach. A small trade in tea, tobacco, opium, and silk is all that is left. The chief revenue is derived from the taxes levied on the numerous Chinese gambling-houses in the city, which have gained for it the title of the Monte Carlo of the East. Macao is situated on a small peninsula connected by a long, narrow causeway with the island of Heung Shan. 
The town faces southward and, sheltered by another island from the boisterous gales of the China seas, is yet cooled by the re- freshing breezes of the south, from which quarter the wind blows most of the year in that latitude. Victoria in our colony, on the other hand, is cut off from them by the high Peak towering above it; and its climate in consequence is hot and steamy in the long and unpleasant summer. So Macao is, then, a favourite resort of the citizens of Hong Kong. The large, flat-bottomed steamer that runs between the two places is generally crowded on Saturdays with inhabitants of the British colony, going to spend the week-end on the cooler rival island. The commercial competition of Macao is no longer to be dreaded. But this decaying Portu- guese possession has recently acquired a certain importance in the eyes of the Hong Kong author- ities and our statesmen in England by the fears of French aggression aroused by apparent en- deavours to gain a footing in Macao. Attempts have been made to purchase property in it in the name of the French Government which are sus- pected to be the thin end of the wedge. Although the colony is not dangerous in the hands of its present possessors, it might become so in the power of more enterprising neighbours. Were it occu- pied by the French a much larger garrison would be required in Hong Kong. Of course, any attempt to invade our colony from Macao would be difficult ; as the transports could not be convoyed by any large warships owing to the shallowness of the sea between the two places until Hong Kong harbour is reached. One battleship or cruiser, even without the assistance of the forts, should suffice to blow out of the water any vessels of sufficiently light draught to come out of the port of Macao. If any specially constructed, powerfully armed, shallow-draught men-o*-war — which alone would be serviceable — were sent out from Europe, their arrival would be noted and their purpose suspected. Still an opportunity might be seized when our China squadron was elsewhere engaged and the garrison of Hong Kong denuded. On the whole, the Portuguese are preferable neighbours to the aggressive French colonial party, which is con- stantly seeking to extend its influence in Southern China.
In 1802 and again in 1808 Macao was occupied by us as a precaution against its seizure by the French. When garrison duty in Hong Kong during the damp, hot days of the summer palled, I once took ten days' leave to the pleasanter climate of Macao. I embarked in Victoria in one of the large, shallow- draught steamers of the Hong Kong, Canton, and Macao Steamboat Company, which keeps up the communication between the English and Portuguese colonies and the important Chinese city by a fleet of some half-dozen vessels. With the exception of one, they are all large and roomy craft from 2,000 to 3,000 tons burden. They run to, and return from. Canton twice daily on week-days. One starts from Hong Kong to Macao every afternoon and returns the following morning, except on Sundays. Between Macao and Canton they ply three times a week. The fares are not exorbitant — from Hong Kong to Macao three dollars, to Canton five, each way ; between Macao and Canton three. The Hong Kong dollar in 1901 was worth about IS. lod. The steamer on which I made the short passage to Macao was the Heungshan (1,998 tons). She was a large shallow-draught vessel, painted white for the sake of coolness. She was mastless, with one high funnel, painted black ; the upper deck was roomy and almost unobstructed. The sides between it and the middle deck were open; and a wide promenade lay all round the outer bulkheads of the cabins on the latter. Extending from amid- ships to near the bows were the first-class state- rooms and a spacious, white - and - gold - panelled saloon. For ard of this the deck was open. Shaded by the upper deck overhead, this formed a delight- ful spot to laze in long chairs and gaze over the placid water of the land-locked sea at the ever- changing scenery. Aft on the same deck was the second-class accommodation. Between the outer row of cabins round the sides a large open space was left.
O vapor SS Heungshan de quase 2 mil toneladas entrando no Porto de Macau
This was crowded with fat and prosperous- looking Chinamen, lolling on chairs or mats, smoking long-stemmed pipes with tiny bowls and surrounded by piles of luggage. Below, on the lower deck, were herded the third- class passengers, all Chinese coolies. The com- panion-ways leading up to the main deck were closed by padlocked iron gratings. At the head of each stood an armed sentry, a half-caste or Chinese quartermaster in bluejacket-like uniform and naval straw hat He was equipped with carbine and revolver ; and close by him was a rack of rifles and cutlasses. All the steamers plying between Hong Kong, Macao, and Canton are similarly guarded; for the pirates who infest the Pearl River and the net- work of creeks near its mouth have been known to embark on them as innocent coolies and then suddenly rise, overpower the crew and seize the ship. For these vessels, besides conveying specie and cargo, have generally a number of wealthy Chinese passengers aboard, who frequently carry large sums of money with them. The Heungshan cast off from the crowded, bustling wharf and threaded her way out of Hong Kong harbour between the numerous merchant ships lying at anchor. In between Lantau and the mainland we steamed over the placid water of what seemed an inland lake. The shallow sea is here so covered with islands that it is generally as smooth as a mill-pond. Past stately moving junks and fussy little steam launches we held our way. Islands and mainland rising in green hills from the waters edge hemmed in the narrow channel. 
 Casa do cônsul de Portugal em Hong Kong no final do século XIX
In about two and a half hours we sighted Macao. We saw ahead of us a low eminence covered with the buildings of a European-looking town. Behind it rose a range of bleak mountains. We passed along by a gently curving bay lined with houses and fringed with trees, rounded a cape, and entered the natural harbour which lies between low hills. It was crowded with junks and sampans. In the middle lay a trim Portuguese gunboat, the Zaire, three-masted, with white superstructure and funnel and black hull. The small Canton- Macao steamer was moored to the wharf. The quay was lined with Chinese houses, two- or three - storied, with arched verandahs. The Heungshan ran alongside, the hawsers were made fast, and gangways run ashore. The Chinese passengers, carrying their baggage, trooped on to the wharf. One of them in his hurry knocked roughly against a Portuguese Customs officer who caught him by the pigtail and boxed his ears in reward for his awkwardness. It was a refreshing sight after the pampered and petted way in which the Chinaman is treated by the authorities in Hong Kong. There the lowest coolie can be as im- pertinent as he likes to Europeans, for he knows that the white man who ventures to chastise him for his insolence will be promptly summoned to appear before a magistrate and fined. Our treat- ment of the subject races throughout our Empire errs chiefly in its lack of common justice to the European. Seated in a ricksha, pulled and pushed by two coolies up steep streets, I was finally deposited at the door of the Boa Vista Hotel. This excellent hostelry — which the French endeavoured to secure for a naval hospital, and which has since been purchased by the Portuguese Government — was picturesquely situated on a low hill overlooking the town. The ground on one side fell sharply down to the sea which lapped the rugged rocks and sandy beach two or three hundred feet below.
On the other, from the foot of the hill, a pretty bay with a tree-shaded esplanade — called the Praia Grande — stretched away to a high cape about a mile distant. The bay was bordered by a line of houses, prominent among which was the Governor s Palace. Behind them the city, built on rising ground, rose in terraces. The buildings were all of the Southern European type, with tiled roofs, Venetian-shuttered windows, and walls painted pink, white, blue, or yellow. Away in the heart of the town the gaunt, shattered fagade of a ruined church stood on a slight eminence. Here and there small hills crowned with the crumbling walls of ancient forts rose up around the city. Eager for a closer acquaintance with Macao, I drove out that afternoon in a rickshaw. I was whirled first along the Praia Grande, which runs around the curving bay below the hotel. On the right-hand side lay a strongly built sea-wall. On the tree-shaded promenade between it and the road- way groups of the inhabitants of the city were enjoying the cool evening breeze. Sturdy little Portuguese soldiers in dark-blue uniforms and k^pis strolled along in two and threes, ogling the yellow or dark-featured Macaese ladies, a few of whom wore mantillas. Half-caste youths, resplendent in loud check suits and immaculate collars and cuffs, sat on the sea-wall or, airily puflfing their cheap cigarettes, sauntered along the promenade with languid grace. Grave citizens walked with their families, the prettier portion of whom affected to be demurely unconscious of the admiring looks of the aforesaid dandies. A couple of priests in shovel hats and long, black cassocks moved along in the throng.
The left side of the Praia was lined with houses, among which were some fine buildings, including the Government, Post and Telegraph Bureaus, commercial offices, private residences, and a large mansion, with two projecting wings, the Governor s Palace. At the entrance stood a sentry, while the rest of the guard lounged near the doorway. At the end of the Praia Grande were the pretty public gardens, shaded by banyan trees, with flower-beds, a bandstand, and a large building beyond it — the Military Club. Past the gate of the Gardens the road turned away from the sea and ran between rows of Chinese houses until it reached the long, tree-bordered Estrada da Flora. On the left lay cultivated land. On the right the ground sloped gently back to a bluff hill, on which stood a light- house, the oldest in China. At the foot of this eminence lay the pretty summer residence of the Governor, picturesquely named Flora, surrounded by gardens and fenced in by a granite wall. Con- tinuing under the name of Estrada da Bella Vista, the road ran on to the sea and turned to the left around a flower -bordered, terraced green mound, at the summit of which was a look-out whence a charming view was obtained. From this the mound derives the name of Bella Vista. In front lay a shallow bay.
To the left the shore curved round to a long, low, sandy causeway, which connects Macao with the island of Heung Shan. Midway on this stood a masonry gateway, Porta Cerco, which marks the boundary between Portuguese and Chinese territory. Hemmed in by a sea-wall, the road continued from Bella. Vista along above the beach, past the isthmus, on which was a branch road leading to the Porta, by a stretch of cultivated ground, and round the peninsula, until it reached the city again. After dinner that evening, accompanied by a friend staying at the same hotel, I strolled down to the Public Gardens, where the police band was playing and the "beauty and fashion" of Macao assembled. They were crowded with gay pro- menaders. Trim Portuguese naval or military officers, brightly dressed ladies, soldiers, civilians, priests and laity strolled up and down the walks or sat on the benches. Sallow-complexioned children chased each other round the flower-beds. Opposite the bandstand stood a line of chairs reserved for the Governor and his party. 
Documento do consulado espanhol em Macau. 1871
We met some acquaintances among the few British residents in the colony; and one of them, being an honorary member of the Military Club situated at one end of the Gardens, invited us into it. We sat at one of the little tables on the terrace, where the ^lite of Macao drank their coffee and liqueurs, and watched the gay groups promenading below. The scene was animated and interesting, thoroughly typical of the way in which Continental nations enjoy outdoor life, as the English never can. Hong Kong, with all its wealth and large European population, has no similar social gathering-place; and its citizens wrap themselves in truly British unneighbourly isolation. The government of Macao is administered from Portugal. The Governor is appointed from Europe; and the local Senate is vested solely with the muni- cipal administration of the colony. The garrison consists of Portuguese artillerymen to man the forts and a regiment of Infantry of the Line, relieved regularly from Europe. There is also a battalion of police, supplemented by Indian and Chinese constables — the former recruited among the natives of the Portuguese territory of Goa on the Bombay coast, though many of the sepoys hail from British India. A gunboat is generally stationed in the harbour. The troubles all over China in 1900 had a disturbing influence even in this isolated Portu- guese colony. An attack from Canton was feared in Macao as well as in Hong Kong; and the utmost vigilance was observed by the garrison. One night heavy firing was heard from the direction of the Porta Cerco, the barrier on the isthmus. It was thought that the Chinese were at last descending on the settlement. The alarm sounded and the troops were called out. Sailors were landed from the Zaire with machine-guns. A British resident in Macao told me that so prompt were the garrison in turning out that in twenty minutes all were at their posts and every position for defence occupied. At each street-corner stood a strong guard; and machine-guns were placed so as to prevent any attempt on the part of the Chinese in the city to aid their fellow-countrymen outside. However, it was found that the alarm was occasioned by the villagers who lived just outside the boundary, firing on the guards at the barrier in revenge for the continual insults to which their women, when passing in and out to market in Macao, were subjected by the Portuguese soldiers at the gate. No attack followed and the incident had no further consequences. At the close of 1901 or the beginning of 1902, more serious alarm was caused by the conduct of the regiment recently arrived from Portugal in relief Dissatisfied with their pay or at service in the East, the men mutinied and threatened to seize the town. The situation was difficult, as they formed the major portion of the garrison. Eventu- ally, however, the artillerymen, the police battalion, and the sailors from the Zaire succeeded in over- awing and disarming them. The ringleaders were seized and punished, and that incident closed. The European-born Portuguese in the colony are few and consist chiefly of the Government officials and their families and the troops. They look down upon the Macaese — as the colonials are called — with the supreme contempt of the pure-blooded white man for the half-caste. For, judging from their complexions and features, few of the Macaese are of unmixed descent.
So the Portuguese from Europe keep rigidly aloof from them and unbend only to the few British and Americans resident in the colony. These are warmly welcomed in Macao society and freely admitted into the exclusive official circles. On the day following my arrival, I went in uniform to call upon the Governor in the palace on the Praia Grande. Accompanied by a friend, I rickshaed from the hotel to the gate of the court- yard. The guard at the entrance saluted as we approached ; and I endeavoured to explain the reason of our coming to the sergeant in command. English and French were both beyond his under- standing ; but he called to his assistance a function- ary, clad in gorgeous livery, who succeeded in grasping the fact that we wished to see the aide-de- camp to the Governor. He ushered us into a waiting-room opening off the spacious hall. In a few minutes a smart, good-looking officer in white duck uniform entered. He was the aide-de-camp, Senhor Carvalhaes. Speaking in fluent French, he informed us that the Governor was not in the palace but would probably soon return, and invited us to wait. He chatted pleasantly with us, gave us much interesting information about Macao, and proffered his services to make our stay in Portuguese territory as enjoyable as he could. We soon became on very friendly terms and he accepted an invitation to dine with us at the hotel that night. The sound of the guard turning out and presenting arms told us that the Governor had returned. Senhor Carvalhaes, praying us to excuse him, went out to inform his Excellency of our presence. In a few minutes the Governor entered and courteously welcomed us to Macao. He spoke English ex- tremely well ; although he had only begun to learn it since he came to the colony not very long before. After a very pleasant and friendly interview with him we took our departure, escorted to the door by the aide-de-camp. 

Macau na viragem do século 19 para o século 20. Eis um retrato de Macau feito pelo capitão Gordon Casserly do exército indiano. O capítulo X foi dedicado a Macau.
Bairro S. Lázaro
In the portuguese colony of Macao - pages 231-255
Forty miles from Hong Kong, hidden away among the countless islands that fringe the entrance to the estuary of the Chukiang or Pearl River, lies the Portuguese settlement of Macao. Once flourishing and prosperous, the centre of European trade with Southern China, it is now decaying and almost unknown — killed by the com- petition of its young and successful rival. Long before Elizabeth ascended the throne of England the venturesome Portuguese sailors and merchants had reached the Far East. There they carried their country's flag over seas where now it never flies. An occasional gunboat represents in Chinese waters their once powerful and far-roaming navy. In the island of Lampacao, off the south-eastern coast, their traders were settled, pushing their com- merce with the mainland. In 1557 the neigh- bouring peninsula of Macao was ceded to them in token of the Chinese Emperor's gratitude for their aid in destroying the power of a pirate chief who had long held sway in the seas around. The Dutch, the envious rivals of the Portuguese in the East, turned covetous eyes on the little colony which speedily began to flourish. In 1622 the troops in Macao were despatched to assist the Chinese against the Tartars. Taking advantage of their absence, the Governor of the Dutch East Indies fitted out a fleet to capture their city. In the June of that year the hostile ships appeared off Macao and landed a force to storm the fort The valiant citizens fell upon and defeated the invaders ; and the Dutch sailed away baffled. Until the early part of the nineteenth century the Portuguese paid an annual tribute of five hundred taels to the Chinese Government in acknowledgment of their nominal suzerainty. In 1848, the then Governor, Ferreira Amaral, refused to continue this payment and expelled the Chinese officials from the colony. In 1887, the independence of Macao was formally admitted by the Emperor in a treaty to that effect. But the palmy days of its commerce died with the birth of Hong Kong. The importance of the Portuguese settlement has dwindled away. Macao is but a relic of the past. Its harbour is empty. The sea around has silted up with the detritus from the Pearl River until now no large vessels can approach. A small trade in tea, tobacco, opium, and silk is all that is left. The chief revenue is derived from the taxes levied on the numerous Chinese gambling-houses in the city, which have gained for it the title of the Monte Carlo of the East. Macao is situated on a small peninsula connected by a long, narrow causeway with the island of Heung Shan. 
The town faces southward and, sheltered by another island from the boisterous gales of the China seas, is yet cooled by the re- freshing breezes of the south, from which quarter the wind blows most of the year in that latitude. Victoria in our colony, on the other hand, is cut off from them by the high Peak towering above it; and its climate in consequence is hot and steamy in the long and unpleasant summer. So Macao is, then, a favourite resort of the citizens of Hong Kong. The large, flat-bottomed steamer that runs between the two places is generally crowded on Saturdays with inhabitants of the British colony, going to spend the week-end on the cooler rival island. The commercial competition of Macao is no longer to be dreaded. But this decaying Portu- guese possession has recently acquired a certain importance in the eyes of the Hong Kong author- ities and our statesmen in England by the fears of French aggression aroused by apparent en- deavours to gain a footing in Macao. Attempts have been made to purchase property in it in the name of the French Government which are sus- pected to be the thin end of the wedge. Although the colony is not dangerous in the hands of its present possessors, it might become so in the power of more enterprising neighbours. Were it occu- pied by the French a much larger garrison would be required in Hong Kong. Of course, any attempt to invade our colony from Macao would be difficult ; as the transports could not be convoyed by any large warships owing to the shallowness of the sea between the two places until Hong Kong harbour is reached. One battleship or cruiser, even without the assistance of the forts, should suffice to blow out of the water any vessels of sufficiently light draught to come out of the port of Macao. If any specially constructed, powerfully armed, shallow-draught men-o*-war — which alone would be serviceable — were sent out from Europe, their arrival would be noted and their purpose suspected. Still an opportunity might be seized when our China squadron was elsewhere engaged and the garrison of Hong Kong denuded. On the whole, the Portuguese are preferable neighbours to the aggressive French colonial party, which is con- stantly seeking to extend its influence in Southern China.
In 1802 and again in 1808 Macao was occupied by us as a precaution against its seizure by the French. When garrison duty in Hong Kong during the damp, hot days of the summer palled, I once took ten days' leave to the pleasanter climate of Macao. I embarked in Victoria in one of the large, shallow- draught steamers of the Hong Kong, Canton, and Macao Steamboat Company, which keeps up the communication between the English and Portuguese colonies and the important Chinese city by a fleet of some half-dozen vessels. With the exception of one, they are all large and roomy craft from 2,000 to 3,000 tons burden. They run to, and return from. Canton twice daily on week-days. One starts from Hong Kong to Macao every afternoon and returns the following morning, except on Sundays. Between Macao and Canton they ply three times a week. The fares are not exorbitant — from Hong Kong to Macao three dollars, to Canton five, each way ; between Macao and Canton three. The Hong Kong dollar in 1901 was worth about IS. lod. The steamer on which I made the short passage to Macao was the Heungshan (1,998 tons). She was a large shallow-draught vessel, painted white for the sake of coolness. She was mastless, with one high funnel, painted black ; the upper deck was roomy and almost unobstructed. The sides between it and the middle deck were open; and a wide promenade lay all round the outer bulkheads of the cabins on the latter. Extending from amid- ships to near the bows were the first-class state- rooms and a spacious, white - and - gold - panelled saloon. For ard of this the deck was open. Shaded by the upper deck overhead, this formed a delight- ful spot to laze in long chairs and gaze over the placid water of the land-locked sea at the ever- changing scenery. Aft on the same deck was the second-class accommodation. Between the outer row of cabins round the sides a large open space was left.
O vapor SS Heungshan de quase 2 mil toneladas entrando no Porto de Macau
This was crowded with fat and prosperous- looking Chinamen, lolling on chairs or mats, smoking long-stemmed pipes with tiny bowls and surrounded by piles of luggage. Below, on the lower deck, were herded the third- class passengers, all Chinese coolies. The com- panion-ways leading up to the main deck were closed by padlocked iron gratings. At the head of each stood an armed sentry, a half-caste or Chinese quartermaster in bluejacket-like uniform and naval straw hat He was equipped with carbine and revolver ; and close by him was a rack of rifles and cutlasses. All the steamers plying between Hong Kong, Macao, and Canton are similarly guarded; for the pirates who infest the Pearl River and the net- work of creeks near its mouth have been known to embark on them as innocent coolies and then suddenly rise, overpower the crew and seize the ship. For these vessels, besides conveying specie and cargo, have generally a number of wealthy Chinese passengers aboard, who frequently carry large sums of money with them. The Heungshan cast off from the crowded, bustling wharf and threaded her way out of Hong Kong harbour between the numerous merchant ships lying at anchor. In between Lantau and the mainland we steamed over the placid water of what seemed an inland lake. The shallow sea is here so covered with islands that it is generally as smooth as a mill-pond. Past stately moving junks and fussy little steam launches we held our way. Islands and mainland rising in green hills from the waters edge hemmed in the narrow channel. 
 Casa do cônsul de Portugal em Hong Kong no final do século XIX
In about two and a half hours we sighted Macao. We saw ahead of us a low eminence covered with the buildings of a European-looking town. Behind it rose a range of bleak mountains. We passed along by a gently curving bay lined with houses and fringed with trees, rounded a cape, and entered the natural harbour which lies between low hills. It was crowded with junks and sampans. In the middle lay a trim Portuguese gunboat, the Zaire, three-masted, with white superstructure and funnel and black hull. The small Canton- Macao steamer was moored to the wharf. The quay was lined with Chinese houses, two- or three - storied, with arched verandahs. The Heungshan ran alongside, the hawsers were made fast, and gangways run ashore. The Chinese passengers, carrying their baggage, trooped on to the wharf. One of them in his hurry knocked roughly against a Portuguese Customs officer who caught him by the pigtail and boxed his ears in reward for his awkwardness. It was a refreshing sight after the pampered and petted way in which the Chinaman is treated by the authorities in Hong Kong. There the lowest coolie can be as im- pertinent as he likes to Europeans, for he knows that the white man who ventures to chastise him for his insolence will be promptly summoned to appear before a magistrate and fined. Our treat- ment of the subject races throughout our Empire errs chiefly in its lack of common justice to the European. Seated in a ricksha, pulled and pushed by two coolies up steep streets, I was finally deposited at the door of the Boa Vista Hotel. This excellent hostelry — which the French endeavoured to secure for a naval hospital, and which has since been purchased by the Portuguese Government — was picturesquely situated on a low hill overlooking the town. The ground on one side fell sharply down to the sea which lapped the rugged rocks and sandy beach two or three hundred feet below.
On the other, from the foot of the hill, a pretty bay with a tree-shaded esplanade — called the Praia Grande — stretched away to a high cape about a mile distant. The bay was bordered by a line of houses, prominent among which was the Governor s Palace. Behind them the city, built on rising ground, rose in terraces. The buildings were all of the Southern European type, with tiled roofs, Venetian-shuttered windows, and walls painted pink, white, blue, or yellow. Away in the heart of the town the gaunt, shattered fagade of a ruined church stood on a slight eminence. Here and there small hills crowned with the crumbling walls of ancient forts rose up around the city. Eager for a closer acquaintance with Macao, I drove out that afternoon in a rickshaw. I was whirled first along the Praia Grande, which runs around the curving bay below the hotel. On the right-hand side lay a strongly built sea-wall. On the tree-shaded promenade between it and the road- way groups of the inhabitants of the city were enjoying the cool evening breeze. Sturdy little Portuguese soldiers in dark-blue uniforms and k^pis strolled along in two and threes, ogling the yellow or dark-featured Macaese ladies, a few of whom wore mantillas. Half-caste youths, resplendent in loud check suits and immaculate collars and cuffs, sat on the sea-wall or, airily puflfing their cheap cigarettes, sauntered along the promenade with languid grace. Grave citizens walked with their families, the prettier portion of whom affected to be demurely unconscious of the admiring looks of the aforesaid dandies. A couple of priests in shovel hats and long, black cassocks moved along in the throng.
The left side of the Praia was lined with houses, among which were some fine buildings, including the Government, Post and Telegraph Bureaus, commercial offices, private residences, and a large mansion, with two projecting wings, the Governor s Palace. At the entrance stood a sentry, while the rest of the guard lounged near the doorway. At the end of the Praia Grande were the pretty public gardens, shaded by banyan trees, with flower-beds, a bandstand, and a large building beyond it — the Military Club. Past the gate of the Gardens the road turned away from the sea and ran between rows of Chinese houses until it reached the long, tree-bordered Estrada da Flora. On the left lay cultivated land. On the right the ground sloped gently back to a bluff hill, on which stood a light- house, the oldest in China. At the foot of this eminence lay the pretty summer residence of the Governor, picturesquely named Flora, surrounded by gardens and fenced in by a granite wall. Con- tinuing under the name of Estrada da Bella Vista, the road ran on to the sea and turned to the left around a flower -bordered, terraced green mound, at the summit of which was a look-out whence a charming view was obtained. From this the mound derives the name of Bella Vista. In front lay a shallow bay.
To the left the shore curved round to a long, low, sandy causeway, which connects Macao with the island of Heung Shan. Midway on this stood a masonry gateway, Porta Cerco, which marks the boundary between Portuguese and Chinese territory. Hemmed in by a sea-wall, the road continued from Bella. Vista along above the beach, past the isthmus, on which was a branch road leading to the Porta, by a stretch of cultivated ground, and round the peninsula, until it reached the city again. After dinner that evening, accompanied by a friend staying at the same hotel, I strolled down to the Public Gardens, where the police band was playing and the "beauty and fashion" of Macao assembled. They were crowded with gay pro- menaders. Trim Portuguese naval or military officers, brightly dressed ladies, soldiers, civilians, priests and laity strolled up and down the walks or sat on the benches. Sallow-complexioned children chased each other round the flower-beds. Opposite the bandstand stood a line of chairs reserved for the Governor and his party. 
Documento do consulado espanhol em Macau. 1871
We met some acquaintances among the few British residents in the colony; and one of them, being an honorary member of the Military Club situated at one end of the Gardens, invited us into it. We sat at one of the little tables on the terrace, where the ^lite of Macao drank their coffee and liqueurs, and watched the gay groups promenading below. The scene was animated and interesting, thoroughly typical of the way in which Continental nations enjoy outdoor life, as the English never can. Hong Kong, with all its wealth and large European population, has no similar social gathering-place; and its citizens wrap themselves in truly British unneighbourly isolation. The government of Macao is administered from Portugal. The Governor is appointed from Europe; and the local Senate is vested solely with the muni- cipal administration of the colony. The garrison consists of Portuguese artillerymen to man the forts and a regiment of Infantry of the Line, relieved regularly from Europe. There is also a battalion of police, supplemented by Indian and Chinese constables — the former recruited among the natives of the Portuguese territory of Goa on the Bombay coast, though many of the sepoys hail from British India. A gunboat is generally stationed in the harbour. The troubles all over China in 1900 had a disturbing influence even in this isolated Portu- guese colony. An attack from Canton was feared in Macao as well as in Hong Kong; and the utmost vigilance was observed by the garrison. One night heavy firing was heard from the direction of the Porta Cerco, the barrier on the isthmus. It was thought that the Chinese were at last descending on the settlement. The alarm sounded and the troops were called out. Sailors were landed from the Zaire with machine-guns. A British resident in Macao told me that so prompt were the garrison in turning out that in twenty minutes all were at their posts and every position for defence occupied. At each street-corner stood a strong guard; and machine-guns were placed so as to prevent any attempt on the part of the Chinese in the city to aid their fellow-countrymen outside. However, it was found that the alarm was occasioned by the villagers who lived just outside the boundary, firing on the guards at the barrier in revenge for the continual insults to which their women, when passing in and out to market in Macao, were subjected by the Portuguese soldiers at the gate. No attack followed and the incident had no further consequences. At the close of 1901 or the beginning of 1902, more serious alarm was caused by the conduct of the regiment recently arrived from Portugal in relief Dissatisfied with their pay or at service in the East, the men mutinied and threatened to seize the town. The situation was difficult, as they formed the major portion of the garrison. Eventu- ally, however, the artillerymen, the police battalion, and the sailors from the Zaire succeeded in over- awing and disarming them. The ringleaders were seized and punished, and that incident closed. The European-born Portuguese in the colony are few and consist chiefly of the Government officials and their families and the troops. They look down upon the Macaese — as the colonials are called — with the supreme contempt of the pure-blooded white man for the half-caste. For, judging from their complexions and features, few of the Macaese are of unmixed descent.
So the Portuguese from Europe keep rigidly aloof from them and unbend only to the few British and Americans resident in the colony. These are warmly welcomed in Macao society and freely admitted into the exclusive official circles. On the day following my arrival, I went in uniform to call upon the Governor in the palace on the Praia Grande. Accompanied by a friend, I rickshaed from the hotel to the gate of the court- yard. The guard at the entrance saluted as we approached ; and I endeavoured to explain the reason of our coming to the sergeant in command. English and French were both beyond his under- standing ; but he called to his assistance a function- ary, clad in gorgeous livery, who succeeded in grasping the fact that we wished to see the aide-de- camp to the Governor. He ushered us into a waiting-room opening off the spacious hall. In a few minutes a smart, good-looking officer in white duck uniform entered. He was the aide-de-camp, Senhor Carvalhaes. Speaking in fluent French, he informed us that the Governor was not in the palace but would probably soon return, and invited us to wait. He chatted pleasantly with us, gave us much interesting information about Macao, and proffered his services to make our stay in Portuguese territory as enjoyable as he could. We soon became on very friendly terms and he accepted an invitation to dine with us at the hotel that night. The sound of the guard turning out and presenting arms told us that the Governor had returned. Senhor Carvalhaes, praying us to excuse him, went out to inform his Excellency of our presence. In a few minutes the Governor entered and courteously welcomed us to Macao. He spoke English ex- tremely well ; although he had only begun to learn it since he came to the colony not very long before. After a very pleasant and friendly interview with him we took our departure, escorted to the door by the aide-de-camp.

quarta-feira, 28 de outubro de 2009

Espólio do Governador Gabriel Teixeira no AHU

Em Dezembro de 2007, foi feita ao AHU pelo Senhor José Luís Vieira de Castro Teixeira, doação de documentação do espólio de seu pai, capitão-de-mar-e-guerra Gabriel Maurício Teixeira, que foi Governador de Macau entre 1940 e 1946 e governador-geral de Moçambique entre 1946 e 1958.
O espólio é constituído, essencialmente, por álbuns fotográficos, pastas de correspondência, relatórios, mensagens e impressos da Junta de Investigações do Ultramar, como se pode ver na relação provisória adiante transcrita.
Documentos relativos a Macau:
1. Álbum fotográfico das documentações dos centenários da fundação e restauração de Portugal em Macau.
2. Mensagem ao governador de Macau Gabriel Teixeira pelos membros da Comunidade Asiático-Britânica em 1945.
3. Homenagem da Comunidade Francesa de Macau.
4. Mensagem da Comunidade Asiático-Britânica em 1944.
5. Mensagem da Comunidade Indiana ao Governador de Macau Comandante Gabriel Teixeira.
6. Mensagem da Comunidade Irlandesa em Macau.
7. Mensagem da Comunidade Holandesa ao Governador de Macau.
8. Mensagem da Comunidade Filipina ao Governador de Macau.
9. Carta da Associação Confuciana de Macau.
10. Mensagem da Comunidade Portuguesa de Hong Kong refugiada em Macau.
11. Mensagem da Comunidade Britânica de Macau.
12. Mensagem da Comunidade Russa refugiada em Macau.
13. Pasta contendo diversos documentos “cartas, relatórios, etc.…” relativos ao período em que o Comandante Gabriel Teixeira foi Governador de Macau.
14. Álbum relativo às comemorações do centenário da fundação e restauração de Portugal em 1940

terça-feira, 27 de outubro de 2009

Historiador português investiga diáspora macaense em Xangai

A História daqueles que partiram
Um historiador português está a fazer um trabalho de investigação sobre o primeiro grande movimento migratório da comunidade macaense. É uma viagem aos meados do século XIX e a Xangai, numa tentativa de perceber as características da comunidade que lá se instalou e das repercussões para a terra de onde partiu.
É uma abordagem da História em que o povo adquire mais importância do que os habituais protagonistas políticos. Mais do que relatos de vitórias e conquistas, são as estórias das pessoas que interessam a Alfredo Gomes Dias, historiador português que se dedica ao estudo de Macau há mais de duas décadas. Depois de uma série de estudos e livros publicados sobre diferentes temas, o investigador está agora no encalço dos movimentos migratórios dos meados do séc. XIX, aqueles que deram origem à diáspora macaense.“Estou a estudar a primeira fase da diáspora, que corresponde à saída para as regiões mais próximas: Hong Kong e Xangai”, explicou Gomes Dias ao PONTO FINAL.
A abordagem é feita nas perspectivas demográfica e social. Embora inclua o movimento migratório para a antiga colónia britânica, o estudo (feito para a tese de doutoramento) analisa detalhadamente a comunidade de Xangai, desde que foi fundada, nos finais de 1840, até à seu término, que aconteceu com a proclamação da República Popular da China, em 1949. Sobre a metodologia do trabalho, Alfredo Gomes Dias explica que tem “acesso quantitativo às pessoas que emigraram, através dos registos dos consulados”. É a partir destes dados que está “a tentar reconstruir o fluxo migratório, complementado com outras fontes no que toca à descrição das cidades e dos seus recenseamentos”.
A tese vai ainda incluir uma análise sobre o impacto que a emigração teve na própria sociedade macaense. “Há fenómenos sociais que ocorreram em Macau na segunda metade do século XIX que têm origem no fenómeno migratório e que, até agora, nunca foram abordados nessa perspectiva”, defende.
A diáspora macaense em Xangai enquanto tema da tese surgiu “um pouco por acaso”, conta. “Inicialmente, a ideia era fazer um estudo centrado no porto de Macau. Comecei a fazer alguma investigação no Ministério dos Negócios Estrangeiros (MNE), associada às questões da cidade e da demografia”. Durante esta pesquisa, encontrou os livros de registo do consulado de Xangai, “material abundante” sobre a diáspora. E assim decidiu pelo caminho do estudo das emigrações. Gomes Dias espera ter o trabalho concluído até ao final deste ano. “Estou a terminar a investigação empírica, o levantamento dos dados. A partir de Novembro e complementando com mais algumas leituras, estarei apto para começar a escrever a tese”, explicou, de passagem por Macau.
O trabalho, que está a ser feito no departamento de Geografia da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade de Lisboa, surge na sequência daquela que tem vindo a ser, nos últimos anos, a abordagem do académico: a História Social, a “História das pessoas”. “Esta minha aproximação ao movimento migratório e à diáspora é uma forma de tentar fazer uma História mais aproximada do povo, que muitas vezes é esquecido”, enquadra. Sobre a disparidade dos factos históricos locais consoante as fontes, o investigador minimiza o problema. “A história tem um lado subjectivo que depende sempre de quem a escreve, quer seja português, chinês ou francês. O que se passa com Macau não é diferente.” A grande dificuldade dos historiadores ocidentais prende-se com o acesso às fontes chinesas, mas até mesmo neste aspecto o cenário tem vindo a melhorar. “Temos cada vez mais acesso a textos escritos por autores chineses, que têm a sua versão, e que nos permite ir aproximando as nossas versões daquilo que é o olhar chinês.”
in jornal Ponto Final de 13.10.2008 - artigo da autoria de Isabel Castro

Foto do álbum de Maria Augusta de Gascia e Figueiredo, de Shanghai, lembrando os tempos passados em Shanghai/China nos anos 30. Photos from her album remember the old days passed in Shanghai/China in the 30's. Divulgação/published by Projecto Memória Macaense www.memoriamacaense.org

Sob o Signo da Transição - Macau no Século XIX

Livro de Alfredo Gomes Dias editado pelo Instituto Português do Oriente em 1998.
Professor da Escola Superior de Educação de Lisboa, Alfredo Gomes Dias estudou História na Faculdade de Letras de Lisboa.
O interesse por Macau surgiu em 1986, época em que o território “estava muito presente nos jornais, por causa do processo das negociações que levaram ao acordo sobre a transferência”. As notícias foram ao encontro da curiosidade que o historiador já tinha sobre Macau. E foi assim que deixou África enquanto tema de investigação e passou a olhar para o Oriente. O primeiro estudo foi dedicado à Guerra do Ópio. “Desde então nunca mais deixei Macau, apenas fui saltando de temas e de estudos.”

Jornal O Independente: 1868-1898

Este jornal começou por ser um "quinzenário político e noticioso". A sua edição foi suspensa por diversas vezes. Teve também vários formatos e direcções. A redacção ficava no nº 1 da Rua Central. Apesar de uma vida atribulada, foi editado durante praticamente 30 anos.

Presença inglesa em Macau nos séculos XVII e XVIII

Rogério Puga, que há pouco tempo regressou de Macau (onde era professor na Universidade local) para Portugal, é presença assídua aqui no blog.
O segundo livro do historiador acaba de ser editado e intitula-se “Presença inglesa e as relações anglo-portuguesas em Macau (1635-1793)”. A obra de 207 páginas foi publicada pelo Centro de História de além-Mar (Universidade Nova de Lisboa e Universidade dos Açores) e pelo CCCM com o apoio da Fundação Macau.
“O trabalho de pesquisa para o livro demorou cerca de 4 anos e foi feito em Macau, Portugal, Reino Unido e Estados Unidos,” explica o autor adiantando que se trata da “primeira história da presença inglesa em Macau”.
O estudo cruza informação de fontes portuguesas, inglesas e chinesas e revela as vicissitudes e as especificidades da Macau luso-chinesa, mas também da dimensão anglófona do território desde o século XVIII. O trabalho consiste num historial da presença inglesa inicialmente no Oceano Índico, na senda dos portugueses, e posteriormente no Extremo Oriente, mais especificamente em Macau, entre 1635 e 1793, e ainda no Japão, entre 1613-1623, de onde os ingleses tentam estabelecer, em vão, comércio directo com a China.“Após a fundação da Companhia das Índias, em 1600, a Inglaterra inicia o longo processo de expansão comercial e colonial na Ásia, entrando os objectivos comerciais dos mercadores norte-europeus em confronto com os interesses portugueses no Oceano Índico e no Extremo-Oriente, nomeadamente na China e no Japão. A edilidade local de Macau, sobretudo a partir do fim do comércio com Nagasáqui, tenta, a todo o custo, defender o seu monopólio comercial no Império do Meio”, refere o resumo da obra de Puga. A partir de 1700, a presença inglesa torna-se permanente no eixo Macau-Cantão, forçando as administrações lusas e chinesas a adaptarem-se a essa nova realidade, enquanto a economia de Macau se torna gradualmente dependente da presença (indesejada) dos sobrecargas e agentes comerciais ingleses, cujo volume de comércio rapidamente ultrapassa o do trato português, defende o autor. As relações anglo-portuguesas na China Meridional acabam por influenciar a interacção do Senado e do governador de Macau com o mandarinato e forçam os primeiros a defender quer os seus interesses, quer a sobrevivência da cidade em quatro frentes: Goa, Cantão/Pequim, Lisboa e Londres.
Actualmente, Rogério Miguel Puga é investigador auxiliar do Centre for English, Translation, and Anglo-Portuguese Studies (Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Universidade do Porto) e colaborador do Centro de História de Além-Mar e do centro de Estudos Comparatistas (Universidade de Lisboa). Além disso, é docente na Universidade de Macau e colaborador regular no Hoje Macau.
Texto elaborado a partir de uma notícia do jornal Hoje Macau de 27.10.2009

Ponto de encontro

Algum dos leitores de “Macau Antigo” se lembra de Olímpio Jesus dos Santos? Militar em Macau nos anos 50/60?
Responder nos comentários ou a ernestocesar@netcabo.pt

segunda-feira, 26 de outubro de 2009

O fim de uma era *

Alguns dos negócios de Macau vivem quase exclusivamente, ou em grande parte, dos portugueses. E não apenas actividades cuja propriedade é de portugueses, mas também outros, de chineses.
A partida dos portugueses está a reflectir-se em muitos dos negócios chineses de Macau. Ourivesarias, modistas, alfaiates, lojas de mobiliário, antiquários, institutos de beleza, cabeleireiros e supermercados perderam nos últimos meses grande parte dos seus clientes. Nos próximos tempos os números vão decair ainda um pouco mais. Alguns já prevêem o encerramento, outros vão esperar para ver.Gige Cheng é uma das modistas mais procuradas pelas portuguesas. Entre as suas clientes conta com «a fina de flor de Macau», entre juristas senhoras com altas posições na administração pública e mesmo esposas de secretários-adjuntos. Cerca de 80 porcento das suas clientes têm mais de 40 anos e um gosto tradicional.Na sobreloja de uma boutique discreta, perto do mercado de São Francisco, e com a ajuda de uma única costureira, Gige prova, corta e coze tailleurs e vestidos de noite, para uma determinada elite portuguesa. «Quando há visitas presidenciais tenho sempre muito trabalho, há quem encomende dois ou três fatos, um para cada um dos cocktails, almoços e jantares do acontecimento», conta. Na altura da entrevista Gige tinha entre mãos dezenas de vestidos de noite para os festejos da transição. «Tenho uma relação de muitos anos com certas clientes e criei mesmo amizade com algumas», admite. Gige é modista há mais de 20 anos e chegou a ser professora de corte e costura. «Ensinei mesmo algumas portuguesas», relembra. Quando montou o seu negócio as clientes eram metade portugueses, metade chinesas com boa situação económica, mas muitas destas emigraram. A sua clientela ficou então pelos 98 por cento de portuguesas. «Mas neste último ano já perdi quase 80 por cento das regulares», diz. Algumas pedem-lhe para ir para Portugal. Gige tem passsaporte português mas a família está toda em Macau e Hong Kong. A reforma parece-lhe uma escolha mais óbvia. «As roupas de prêt-à-porter são muito baratas e em Zhuhai as modistas trabalham por um preço inferior, se bem que com menos qualidade», revela Gige. Por isso, talvez não lhe reste mais nada a não ser fechar a loja.

Bordados e serviços de Cantão
George Kei, ou Ah Kei, como é mais conhecido, tomou, em Julho de 1999, um dos negócios mais populares entre os portugueses, aquele de Ah Mei, «que, como não tinha visto, teve que voltar para a China». Original de Tsing Tao, terra da melhor cerveja chinesa, George chegou a Hong Kong há 15 anos. Aprendeu inglês e estudou português nos cursos promovidos pelo consulado de Portugal em Hong Kong. «Conhece a minha professora?» pergunta.Era fornecedor de Ah Mei e como tem o seu próprio negócio em Hong Kong resolveu correr o risco nestes últimos tempos da permanência portuguesa em Macau Vende sobretudo toalhas de linho e algodão bordado e serviços de Cantão, que sempre foram muito populares entre os portugueses, que antes da abertura da loja de Ah Mei, iam a Zhuhai, a cidade vizinha a Macau, comprá-los. «O portugueses são os únicos que compram estes produtos de maior qualidade, os estrangeiros, americanos, australianos etc. compram toalhas de poliester e produtos inferiores», revela.«Ontem mesmo a esposa do senhor governador esteve aqui», conta. Mas apesar da popularidade do negócio «o movimento decresceu bastante nestes últimos meses», confessa. Aparecem no entanto muitos turistas portugueses «mas levam produtos leves, nunca levam serviços de louça porque são muito pesados». Ah Kei espera que a loja, na Travessa dos Becos, tenha condições para permanecer aberta até pelo menos ao Ano Novo Chinês, mas não conta permanecer para além de meados do próximo ano.«Vão ficar tão poucos portugueses em Macau que a situação não é muito optimista», explica.

O supermercado dos portugueses
Há mais de 30 anos que o pai de Liu Kong Seng abriu um supermercado no Largo do Senado que se tornou o preferido dos portugueses. Durante as convulsões do «1,2,3», em 1966, o senhor Seng fornecia os portugueses à sucapa, se bem que quase todos os outros estabelecimentos se recusassem a fazê-lo. Neste momento a Seng Cheong tem cinco supermercados, na Taipa e em Macau, e prepara-se para abrir um novo estabelecimento nos Novos Aterros do Porto Exterior «onde moram muitos portugueses», frisa o proprietário.A importação de produtos de Portugal - azeite, azeitonas bacalhau, chouriço - ou de produtos ao gosto luso tem sido um factor de atracção. «Vamos continuar a vender esses produtos, para os macaenses e para os portugueses que cá ficarem», afirma Liu Kong Seng, esperançado que no futuro «mais portugueses venham para Macau, talvez para fazer negócio».Segundo este comerciante, até há alguns meses 75 porcento dos seus clientes eram portugueses, mas essa percentagem desceu para 50 por cento. A abertura de outros supermercados também contribuiu para a que o negócio piorasse mas os portugueses continuam fieis ao Seng Cheong, «não só por causa dos produtos, mas também porque temos um sistema de entrega ao domicílio e os portugueses fazem compras para a semana ou o mês, ao contrário dos chineses que comprar todos os dias», diz o proprietário.

Depilação e tratamentos de beleza
Outro negócio adaptado aos requesitos dos portugueses, neste caso das portuguesas, é o dos salões de beleza que fazem depilação com cera. «Todas as nossa clientes para esse tipo de serviço são portuguesas», diz a proprietária da casa Candy's, Meggie Tam. «Aqui há uns anos fazíamos até 120 mil patacas por mês», informa. «Agora, com a partida das portuguesas não chegamos às 45 mil», diz. Actualmente só metade das clientes são portuguesas e estas já não pedem os tratamentos mais caros, nem compram cremes de beleza. «Antigamente faziam tratamentos de pele completos», diz Meggie, «agora pedem os mais simples e baratos, talvez porque estejam a poupar para voltar a Portugal, onde vão ganhar muito menos do que aqui», diz a esteticista.
Pérolas e ouro a caminho de Portugal
O gerente da ourivesaria Ta Pou, no Hotel Lisboa, admite igualmente que as vendas baixaram bastante por causa da partida dos portugueses, que constituem mais de metade dos seus clientes.«Mas em Novembro e Dezembro o negócio está melhor, por causa do grande prémio e da transferência de soberania», diz William Cheong. Os muitos turistas de Portugal acabam por ir compar ourivesaria à casa que gere, aconselhados por amigos que cá viveram.Apesar de haver bastante concorrência nesta área, a Ta Po atraíu os portugueses porque há mais de 20 anos que se especializou nos gostos destes. «O que procuram mais são pérolas e ouro», explica, « e compram produtos mais baratos que os chineses mas em maior quantidade». Para o ano, William Cheong prevê que o negócio baixe substancialmente. Por isso a Ta Po prepara-se para abriu uma filial em Portugal. «Não sabemos ainda precisamente onde, mas temos lá bons amigos e penso que teremos sucesso», explica o gerente.

Fatos para governadores
Domingos Cheong, ou simplesmente «o senhor Domingos», como é conhecido na comunidade portuguesa, fez nome a cortar fatos para governadores e outros portugueses de nomeada. Entre os governadores contam-se Rocha Vieira, Nobre de Carvalho, Almeida e Costa e Pinto Machado. Mesmo alguns nomes sonantes que só estiveram em Macau de passagem, como Mário Soares, Almeida Santos, ou Adriano Moreira fizeram fatos no senhor Domingos.Alfaiate há mais de 30 anos, confessa que os tempos são maus, não só por causa da partida dos portugueses mas também por causa da crise económica. Nos últimos tempos os clientes portugueses, que constituem metade da sua clientela, têm andado mais preocupados em «compar casa, automóvel, frigorífico e coisas mais importantes do que fatos», diz Domingos Cheong, num português arranhado, desenvolvido ao longo de décadas de contacto com os seus clientes.Já foi a Portugal duas vezes mas parece-lhe muito difícil montar lá negócio. «É preciso é ter esperança», diz, optimista. «Pode ser que para o ano as coisas melhorem». No entanto, Edmundo Ho, o chefe do executivo, não vai continuar a tradição dos seus antecessores. «Ele não manda fazer fatos, não é muito exigente, compra-os já feitos», diz o alfaiate, num certo tom de crítica.

Mobílias e antiguidades
Um outro comércio se tem ressentido da partida dos portugueses: as lojas de antiguidades e de mobiliário chinês antigo. «Perdemos muito negócio nos últimos tempos, devido à partida dos portugueses», diz Rosalina Guia proprietária da loja Cheong Hing. «Antigamente fazíamos mais de 150 mil patacas por mês, mas agora nem chegamos às 100 mil», refere. Antes da transferência de soberania de Hong Kong vendiam bastante aos estrangeiros de Hong Kong. «O que nos salva são ainda esses, mas a partida dos portugueses foi uma grande machadada», diz Rosalina Guia.«Os muitos turistas de Portugal ajudam um pouco mas geralmente só compram coisas pequenas», diz uma empregada da casa Soi Cheong Lorna. «Os chineses não gostam de mobílias usadas ou de antiguidades, só de peças novas e modernas», informa Espi outra vendedora da mesma loja. «Se as coisas continuarem assim talvez a casa tenha de fechar brevemente», continua a filipina. Uma situação que lhe cria a elas e a todas as outras filipinas que trabalham neste ramo problemas de permanência em Macau.«Este ano vendemos 30 por cento menos do que no ano passado devido à partida dos portugueses», diz Sylvia Leung. As vendas baixaram não só em termos de quantidade mas também em termos de qualidade. «Os portugueses compram sobretudo armários, cadeiras, mesas, produtos maiores e mais caros», diz a proprietária da loja Mok Min. «Vamos esperar que continue a haver turistas para o ano, se não vai ser difícil manter o negócio». Os responsáveis por algumas das lojas pensam que a única solução é a exportação. Rosalina Guia afirma que essa parece ser a saída, «mas quando enviamos uma peça para a Europa o preço duplica», explica.Mais um sector da economia de Macau afectado pela partida dos portugueses. Negócios que talvez se tenham de reformular ao gosto local, ou pura e simplesmente deixarão de existir.
* Artigo da autoria da jornalista Clara Gomes publicado na Revista Macau em Dezembro de 1999

Uma vida em Macau *

As suas histórias individuais são mais do que só isso: são pedaços da história de Macau. São portugueses, mas há várias décadas que trocaram o luso solo por uma terra que lhes abriu os braços e que, na maioria dos casos, não desejam abandonar.
Aqui vieram parar pelos mais diferentes motivos: por amor ou casamento, para cumprir o serviço militar, ou então apenas à procura de destino diferente daquele que Portugal lhes reservava.Macau não era a cidade que é hoje. Era uma pequena vila onde todos se conheciam, onde se andava de riquexó, onde se dormia ao som da ventoinha, quando se tinha o privilégio de ter uma, onde ir à praia de Cheoc Wan era uma aventura para todo um fim de semana. A vida era pacata, todos os portugueses sabiam tudo de todos e a sociedade era altamente estratificada e moralista. Quase todos aqueles com que falámos pensam que a vida em Macau melhorou bastante e não são saudosistas em relação ao passado mas admitem que quando a bandeira das cinco quinas descer vão sentir um nó no peito. Alguns como Alberto Alecrim, preferem não assistir ao evento. «Já viste chau min temperado com alecrim?», pergunta, com o humor que lhe é bem conhecido. «Não tenho coração para ver descer a bandeira», diz enquanto sorve um golo de whisky pela chávena do café. Partiu recentemente para Portugal mas não sem a ameaça de cá voltar, tanto mais que a mulher com quem vive há anos aqui permanecerá. Mas terá de evitar o momento em que os chineses que Macau, este secular porto de abrigo, acolheu há uma geração ou duas, de pé descalço, venham gritar «abaixo a humilhação colonialista», um dos slogans já estabelecidos pela Agência Nova China. «São esses, não os chineses de Macau, que agora irão dar vivas à China», pensa o jornalista e animador de rádio que chegou a Macau em 1965. Trabalhou na Emissora nacional colaborou nos jornais e fez parte dos quadros do Gabinete de Comunicação Social até se reformar em 1995. Alecrim fez o serviço militar em Goa onde chegou a estar preso seis meses, após a ocupação indiana. De volta a Portugal pediu a colocação na radio emissora de Angola mas um conhecimento arranjou-lhe emprego na emissora de Macau, «a mais antiga de todas».«Sempre tinha ouvido dizer que Macau era o paraíso», diz Alecrim. Quando chegou não ficou decepcionado se bem que o paraíso já não fosse o que era: já não existiam as pei pa chan e as casas de ópio na Rua da Felicidade nem o Hotel Central, marcos da vida mundana de Macau. Mas a Horta e Costa era ainda uma zona de vivendas, onde as pessoas iam passar férias. Foi ali que foi morar a princípio mas depois mudou-se para a Calçada das Verdades onde pagava 250 patacas de renda. «muito dinheiro, naquela altura em que ganhava 1.134 patacas por mês!»Luis Gonzaga Gomes, «um homem introvertido e autodidata», apresentou-lhe a cidade, em longos passeios.A altura mais conturbada que viveu em Macau foi o «1,2,3» a guerra do chau min como gosta de lhe chamar. Durante cerca de dois meses, no final de 1966, a Revolução Cultural entrou pelas Portas do Cerco adentro. Os portugueses eram expulsos dos autocarros, as mercearias recusavam-se a fornecer-lhes alimentos, os policias eram despidos e agredidos e as manifestações de jovens de livro vermelho na mão sucediam-se. Alecrim, mesmo assim aventurava-se na Praça do Leal Senado, onde viu derrubarem a estátua do coronel Mesquita, para ir até ao edifício dos correios onde ficava a emissora. «Os meus amigos chineses iam-me buscar comida e o Seng Cheong fornecia os portugueses à socapa», conta. O que pensa que salvou a situação foi o facto de os comunistas serem muito organizados. «Se assim não fosse penso que teriam matado toda a gente». A atitude do governador Nobre de Carvalho, chegado em plena crise, foi também importante. «Portugal disse para entregarem isto mas ele, que era um diplomata, resolveu a situação».O 25 de Abril foi outra fase interessante que Alecrim viveu em Macau. Soube do golpe pelo cantor Rui de Mascarenhas, que nessa altura cantava no restaurante Portas do Sol. Depois recebeu os telexes da France Press e da Reuters, que, antes de divulgar, entregou ao então major Lages Ribeiro que controlava a informação oficial. Surgiram então uma série de associações cívicas. Alecrim simpatizava com a ADIM de Carlos Assumpção. «Ninguém é imprescindível mas ele era».Com o seu humor típico, Alecrim não pára de contar histórias de outros tempos e de fazer considerações sobre o papel de governadores e de administradores. «A China nunca nos deu nada, só imigrantes de pé descalço, mas depois de se acordar a transferência, os chineses começaram finalmente a investir», diz sobre um país que acha que sem um regime comunista dificilmente poderia existir. Quanto a Portugal, «nunca mandou um avo para aqui, foi sempre Macau que deu para as outras colónias».Enquanto sorve mais um golo de whisky Alecrim faz planos relativamente aos móveis e outros pertences, que se prepara para embalar para Lisboa, ao fim de uma vida de 35 anos em Macau. Aqui lhe morreu a esposa e um filho, lhe nasceu uma das suas duas filhas e três netos. Em Portugal estará mais perto deles. Mas como a sua companheira fica em Macau, promete voltar brevemente. Talvez o chau min ainda venha a ter alecrim...

Memórias e dominó
No bar da Obra Social da Polícia de Segurança Pública, grupos de idosos jogam ora dominó, ora majong, conforme a cultura. Alguns bebem uma cervejinha ou um chá, conforme o estado de saúde, e conversam. Tratam-se pelas alcunhas que herdaram do serviço militar que os trouxe a Macau antes de ingressarem na polícia. Deixar Macau não parece estar nos planos da maioria. Alguns andam entre Portugal e Macau conforme a estação do ano. Quando lá é Inverno vêm para aqui, onde faz menos frio, mas no Verão refugiam-se da humidade no clima mais temperado do país de onde são naturais. Quase todos concordam que se Portugal é bonito e a comida muito melhor, também é verdade que aqui se gasta menos dinheiro, a vida é mais calma e tudo fica mais perto.A transferência não os assusta, é só mais uma etapa na vida de quem já viu muitas mudanças em Macau.«Eu cá faço vida de turista ando entre cá e lá», afirma José Manuel Duarte também conhecido por «Velhinho». Chegou a Macau em 1962. «Quando cá cheguei, a minha vontade era ir-me embora, isto era só barracas e hortas», diz. Mas não foi. Casou-se e teve filhos, que o ligaram para sempre à terra que a princípio tanto o desiludiu.Adriano Pinto não só casou, como o fez três vezes desde o ano em que chegou, 1949. «E ainda estou para as curvas», ironiza antes de perguntar se conheço o seu filho, o Miro que é cantor. Daniel Pereira que chegou a Macau em 1957 tem quatro filhos e se bem que vá a Portugal todos os anos prefere viver em Macau. «Que faria lá? Ia-me sentar num banco de jardim? Para isso sento-me num banco de jardim aqui», diz, referindo os impostos que em Portugal se pagam sobre as pensões. Daniel Pereira lembra tempos em que em Macau havia menos crimes e mais respeito pela lei e lamenta a mudança dos costumes. «Antigamente se fossemos apanhados a fumar levávamos um grande castigo. Hoje até telefone portátil levam para as rondas...». O guarda reformado não lamenta ter cá feito a sua vida. Se tivesse voltado após a tropa esperava-o a vida dura do campo na zona de Alcácer do Sal onde andava à jorna a 14 escudos por dia.Era também esse o destino do «Espanhol», Bernardino Azevedo, se tivesse regressado. «Esperava-me a enxada, mais nada», admite o polícia que ganhou a alcunha na Guerra Civil de Espanha. Chegou a Macau há 57 anos e foi aqui que aprendeu a ler.

O polícia jardineiro
Origens semelhantes tem o «General», que apesar dos seus 76 anos, 54 em Macau, se conserva activo. Francisco Azevedo toma conta dos deficientes mentais que se encontram no Posto da PSP junto ao canídromo, trata dos equipamentos dos grupos desportivos da polícia e dos jardins de três esquadras. «Dantes também tinha aqui uma horta», observa, apontando para as traseiras do belo edifício do Posto nº2. «Cheguei a oferecer mais de 100 couves portuguesas por alturas do Natal». O «Jardineiro» seria uma alcunha mais bem achada para este policia reformado, mas o bigode retorcido e bem tratado valeu-lhe o cognome militar.Como meio de transporte não prescinde do seu motociclo. É nele que à frente do pelotão, envergando o colete nº1, lidera a maratona de Macau. O «General» fez o serviço militar durante a II Guerra Mundial. Em Junho de 1946 o seu batalhão foi destacado para Macau. Nessa altura ia-se facilmente à China, buscar materiais e até passear. «Em 1947 foi enviada uma delegação militar a Cantão e em 1948 a filha de Chiang Kai Chek veio de visita a Macau, num barco de guerra», relembra o então soldado raso. Porém em 1949, após os comunistas assumirem o poder, fecharam-se as Portas do Cerco. Nessa altura a única rua alcatroada era a Av. Almeida Ribeiro e a Areia Preta era um porto de abrigo. «Só havia pequenos negócios, de peixe salgado, panchões, ou fósforos, algumas lojas que vendiam de tudo e casas de chá», recorda. Transportes, só as carreiras para a China e os riquexós. «Entrei uma vez num mas ao fim de 200 metros saí. Tive pena do homem, a puxar descalço, arreado como um animal», conta. Nunca mais andou de riquexó.Os portugueses eram quase todos militares e os macaenses empregados da administração pública. Os divertimentos eram poucos, segundo o guarda reformado. «No Hotel Central e no Hotel Xavier havia jogo e dança mas só lá entravam os oficiais.»«Um soldado ganhava 30 patacas e um guarda 200», especifica. Quando entrou para a polícia em 1950 começou por receber 245 patacas e fardamento. «Dava para viver mal». Mesmo assim, nesse ano, casou-se com uma senhora chinesa. «A princípio mal conseguíamos falar mas com o tempo ela aprendeu a língua e a cozinha portuguesas». Também ele aprendeu a falar cantonense, em parte nos cursos que eram obrigatórios para os guardas portugueses. Hoje usa a língua com destreza e rapidez, como se fosse um falante nato.Sempre ligado ao desporto, era a Francisco Azevedo que competia cuidar do campo de futebol por trás do Posto nº2, o que fazia ajudado por um grupo de presos, «pakfanistas», deficientes e outros indigentes que estavam a cargo da PSP antes do IASM assumir essa responsabilidade. «Sempre lidei bem com eles e os outros polícias não se importavam com o que lhes acontecesse», justifica. Hoje, trata ainda de um grupo de oito indigentes, que comem e dormem ao lado do jardim da esquadra.Para além do «1,2,3» um dos momentos mais marcantes da história de Macau foi, segundo o «General», o ataque dos chineses na fronteira, em 1952. Quando um soldado de Macau entrou em terra de ninguém para fechar as portas, ao anoitecer, foi atingido numa perna por um tiro do lado chinês. Esvaiu-se em sangue antes de ser socorrido. O governo pediu voluntários para fechar a porta e quando estes o foram fazer os chineses lançaram granadas. «Nessa altura havia cerca de cinco mil soldados em Macau», diz o polícia reformado. A resposta à provocação não tardou «Morreu muita gente do lado de lá sobretudo, civis que viviam em barracas junto à fronteira», relata o «General» que esteve «agarrado» a uma metralhadora no terraço do Posto nº2. Mais tarde houve conversações e Macau pediu uma indemnização para as famílias dos falecidos. «Já nessa altura se falava em entregar Macau, mas os chineses não quiseram», conta.A partida dos portugueses não o assusta. «Sempre tive mais amigos chineses que portugueses». Apesar de não ter filhos, a esposa tem cá a família, nomeadamente a mãe que vive em Cantão e tem mais de cem anos de idade. «Penso que não haverá grandes desacatos. Talvez algumas rixas provocadas pelos pés descalços levados pela propaganda». Mas, até ver, vai ficando, se bem que não prescinda de umas visitas a Santo Tirso onde toda a sua família se dedica à agricultura e horticultura.

Silveira Machado: um Macau divertido
Aos 81 anos Silveira Machado, professor, escritor e poeta conta estórias da história de Macau como ninguém. Sempre charmoso, sobretudo para as senhoras, não é difícil puxar-lhe um conto ou mesmo um poema sobre esta terra que o acolheu há 66 anos.Apesar de aqui ter passado a II Guerra Mundial acha que os piores momentos que aqui viveu foram os do «1,2,3». «Nessa altura já tinha quatro filhos enquanto durante a guerra era solteiro», explica. O pior eram os boatos como aquele sobre o envenenamento do reservatório de água. «Os altifalantes transmitiam informações como por exemplo que os portugueses estavam a roubar o arroz a Macau para enviar para Angola», conta o professor reformado. No entanto, admite que havia portugueses que abusavam do poder, «sobretudo os macaenses e os polícias».Mas, com o seu espírito optimista Silveira Machado arranja até maneira de se lembrar de histórias engraçadas do «1,2,3». Todos os portugueses foram mobilizados e a ele coube-lhe guardar o Banco Nacional Ultramarino. «A maioria nem sabia pegar numa arma», ri-se. Antes da noitada iam buscar um lanchinho e algumas garrafas de vinho a casa e a vigília acabava em paródia. «Dormíamos em cima das secretárias e revezávamo-nos para dormir no gabinete do director do BNU que era o único que tinha alcatifa», recorda com um sorriso.Quanto ao período da grande guerra, acabou por ser «divertido». Era jovem e, graças ao seu pendor noctívago, todos os dias ia dançar e namorar. Mas não se esqueceu do outra face desses tempos. «É aquele lado que nos custa contar... mas lembro-me de ver uma mulher a preparar um rato para comer... outros iam aos excrementos dos animais procurar grãos...», relata com relutância. Porém, nega que se comessem bebés, como já se disse. «Carne humana sim, das pessoas que morriam, mas não se assassinava para comer», diz peremptório. Foi nessa altura que os funcionários públicos começaram a usar camisa larga em vez de fato e gravata e sandálias em vez de sapatos. Não havia nem materiais nem dinheiro para mais.«Nesses tempos a população chinesa de Macau era muito laboriosa; hoje procura fazer dinheiro por artes mágicas», observa, sobre a mudança de costumes trazida pelas vagas de imigrantes. Silveira Machado sempre esteve ligado à cultura e às artes. Fez parte do grupo cénico da Acção Católica dirigido pelo actor profissional José Soveral. E foi um dos fundadores do Clarim. «Os jornais antigamente eram muito diferentes. Havia várias secções, havia críticas de cinema e teatro, contos e poesia», conta. O ambiente era também diferente, havia mais convívio e muitas festas e bailes. Mas nem todos eram bem vindos em qualquer festa. «O Clube Militar era para a elite, o Clube Macau para os tenentes e primeiros oficiais e o Clube 1º de Junho para os sargentos», explica. «Boas festas que em todos eles se faziam», lembra o homem cujo segredo de longevidade é ter privado muito com gente jovem, «para além de nunca ter tido inveja ou sido muito ambicioso».Silveira Machado chegou a Macau em 1933, por mar. Recorda todo o itinerário, o nome dos navios e os rios por onde passou. «O barco de Hong Kong para Macau demorava mais de três horas e parecia uma feira, com vendedores e jogadores». Tinha então 15 anos. O regime severo do Seminário de São José para onde veio estudar não lhe dava grande liberdade mas aos fins de semana ia até à ilha da Lapa ou à China, fazer piqueniques. Tinha 20 anos quando um colega lhe roubou um poema e o distribuiu pela escola. Um poema de amor, claro...«O prefeito disse-me que quem gostava de mulheres não podia ser padre e expulsou-me». Esperava-o o serviço militar. Mas após 40 dias no hospital acabou por ser novamente dispensado. Iniciou-se então na função pública e noutras actividades, como a escrita e o teatro, mais apropriadas a um homem de espírito livre.Ao longo destes anos viu passar por Macau muitos governadores e dirigentes. Guarda boas memórias de Pedro José Lobo, mas pensa que o problema das administrações foi sempre acabarem com o que as anteriores tinham começado, em vez de lhe dar continuação. O governador Carlos Melancia não foi muito mau. «Foi ele que de facto começou o que agora se vê construido», diz.Partir, não está nos seus planos, apesar de ter as filhas em Portugal. «Comprei um andar em Algés, onde caí de paraquedas». É açoriano e tem poucos amigos em Lisboa. «A mentalidade de quem nunca saiu de Portugal é muito diferente», explica Silveira Machado.

Macau, por amor
Nem todos os portugueses que se acolheram a Macau há várias décadas vieram por motivos de trabalho, tropa ou estudos religiosos. Alguns vieram por amor. É caso de Linete Mendes que chegou há 30 anos. Conheceu o marido, João Mendes, em casa da família chinesa deste que vivia na Amadora, onde ela trabalhava num colégio. «Primeiro vim cá ver se gostava», diz. Tal como se tinha apaixonado à primeira vista pelo macaense, apaixonou-se também pela terra deste. «Foram muitas horas de avião até Hong Kong e depois quase quatro de barco», conta. A princípio estranhou alguns dos hábitos chineses, «como os bacios nos restaurantes que afinal serviam apenas para deitar o chá». Mas gostou logo da comida chinesa e da cidade pacata. «À noite íamos de carro passear e comer chau min, na rua». Divertimentos simples de tempos menos complicados. Ao fim de três meses de namoro, casou-se.Tem duas filhas Daniela e Xana que foram ambas miss Macau. Quando eram pequenas não ia muito a festas, mas, aos fins de semana, Coloane era um dos destinos preferidos da família, onde pernoitavam, nas casas de campo de amigos. Ou então levava as miúdas ao jardim, ou ia tomar café e conversar com as amigas para o Hotel Estoril.Aprendeu a cozinhar receitas macaenses e tornou-se perita nalguns pratos, como minci, tacho ou galinha à Macau. Quanto à língua, só fala «chinês de rua» mas tem pena de não a ter aprofundado. «Agora que muitas das minhas amigas macaenses e portuguesas se foram embora podia ter uma relação mais estreita com algumas senhoras chinesas...», lamenta.Quanto a partir, nem pensar. «Gosto muito de estar aqui, gosto do ambiente e dos chineses. No fundo posso dizer que vivi a maior parte da minha vida aqui», reflecte.«Da última vez que fui a Portugal passar férias já estava farta e desejosa de voltar», confessa. Para isso contribui o facto de tudo ser tão distante e dispendioso em Lisboa e também o facto de as filhas e o neto estarem em Macau.E a transição? «Sinto-me um pouco triste por Macau não ser mais nosso, mas não penso que a vida mude muito; vai tudo correr bem», diz, optimista. Apesar da nostalgia, nos dias 19 e 20 de Dezembro vai passear, ver os festejos.«Os chineses sempre me trataram muito bem. Não vejo motivo para que não continuem a tratar os portugueses de uma boa maneira», afirma.Histórias de vidas passadas numa terra acolhedora e generosa.
* Artigo da autoria da jornalista Clara Gomes publicado na Revista Macau em Dezembro de 1999